Route To The Rio

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Fellow Cruisers, Marj and Tom Lamb on mv 3/4 Time

 

After reviewing cruising guides, FB groups, numerous weather sites and Chris Parker { weather guru }, and considering advice from fellow cruisers, it looked like we had a solid sail plan. Years ago when we were in the Bahamas we bought a world radio off our friends Pat and Karl on Ishmael. This radio allowed us to pick up SSB channels and most important the weather report broadcast every morning from Florida, when internet is not available.

All was a go, we checked out of the country‚Ķ.. again, and  prepared Mistress, put together our defense system,  and enjoyed a beautiful sunset.

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Early the next morning we hoisted the anchor and motored out of the harbour to a mark 3 miles from the island. From there we turned north to pass through a reef and the coastline of Nicaragua this is where most of the boarding and thefts are reported to happen. Some say it is the fishermen trying to supplement their income others say if just a bunch or rowdies in boats. When you rob a boat you are a pirate and this is a known problem area.

For the first day, we motor sailed almost directly into the wind, doing a surprisingly 5 knots. The wind had been predicted to be more east, meaning the waves would be from the side. Even though the wind was light it seemed like we were travelling faster than we were, the sound of the wind can fool you. After sunset the wind became lighter and constantly shifted  direction. This caused the boom to slam, and the sails to pop, hard on the rigging but kept the boat steadier and avoid rolling. The next morning we were completely by Nicaragua. and at a place we could begin to ease the sails, and turn west and get a gentler ride. As the sun rose higher in the sky the wind died completely leaving us to sail along at 3 kts. The light wind lasted all day and night, we were still 200 miles away from our destination.

Day 3  Again light winds all day, we had been running the engine al night but now had to conserve fuel to make sure we would not run out. In the evening,a group of dark heavy rain clouds passed over us  one after another we got rained on till we were soaked to the skin. Our old foul weather  was no match. we must have changed 3 or 4 times only to get soaked again.

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Day 4, brought another problem, if we continued along at the present speed we would arrive at nigh tin the dark. The Harbour entrance is reef  strewn on both sides, no place for error. We could turn on the engine, but we would take the chance of running out of fuel,  or just slow right down, and drift for the last 75 miles.  This is what we did.

On the morning of day 5 we had Guanaja in sight and slowly made our way into the harbour.

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Honduras Immigration Office

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